Sandstone, Scaling and Shooting

6 Comments
Dave Morgan says:

So important in the building of the North West’s towns Julia yet so hidden. Well done in bringing it all to a wider audience.

Julia says:

That’s so true Dave, and from what I’ve read, its provided high quality crafted stone for some important buldings too. I think your wonderful poem works so well, so thank you again for that!

Mustafa says:

Excellent blog Julia… steeped in history so may things I’ve learnt; thank you for providing valuable information in such an eloquent way. I’ve spent countless hours of aimless wandering across this region and after this I’ve realised there is so much more to explore and learn. Best wishes Mustafa

Julia says:

Thanks so much for your kind words Mustafa. I agree, this area is so rich in history and interest, there’s always something new to discover!

Roger Grimshaw says:

Great to see a non climbers take on these quarries. I was introduced to them as a teenager many years ago and just as there is no bad wine in youth, there is no bad climbing. I learned the climbing trade there and though I have not been back in many a year I still retain an affection for the place.

Julia says:

Hi Roger,

Thank you – I’m glad you enjoyed the read. I love the quarries, they’re so striking and impactful from a photographic perspective. I’ve been told this area was where climbing started in the UK, so it feels as though I’m walking through something quite historic whenever I head up through the quarries on my way to the masts on Winter Hill. I definitely get the impression these quarries are regarded affectionally by many people!

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